Saturday, September 18, 2010

How To Reduce Home Energy Costs By Sealing Air Leaks

Air leaks With Labor Day past, the autumn and winter months aren't far behind. It's a good time to reflect on your home's heating and cooling costs, and take steps to lower your energy bills. Finding air leaks may be a perfect first project.
According to the U.S. Department of Energy, up to 30 percent can be cut from a home's energy costs just by reducing drafts. For example, a 1/16-inch gap unsealed gap around a window is equivalent to leaving the window 3 inches open.
That's a lot of wasted Brighton air.
The good news is that air leaks are rather simple to identify, and simple to fix. The key is to know where to look. And, to make the job easier, the government offers a complete DIY Guide To Sealing and Insulating a home.
Some of the key tips include:
  • Focus on the attic and basement, where most air is lost
  • Locate problem areas on a chimney
  • Check recessed lights which allow air flow between conditioned and unconditioned air
The government's website also provides a 13-page PDF with detailed images, instructions, and recommendation to help you with the work.
However, if the job is beyond your skill set, be sure to call a qualified contractor. Sealing your home from air leaks will reduce your monthly energy bill and the money spent to pay a professional will be just a fraction of what you'll save over time.
(Image courtesy: US Department of Energy)

Saturday, September 11, 2010

How To Change A Showerhead

There's plenty of reasons to want to change a showerhead in your head. Perhaps you're trying to fix a leak in the faucet; or, remodeling your bathroom; or, trying to conserve water via a low-flow showerhead.
Whatever the reason, changing a showerhead can be a basic do-it-yourself project. The tools aren't complicated and the job is a quick one.
In this 2-minute video from AOL, you'll learn:
  • What tools you'll need to change the showerhead
  • How to remove your old showerhead
  • How to firmly attach your new showerhead to prevent leaks
If you get stuck, or just want to outsource, call a professional handyman to finish the job. Changing a showerhead should take less than a hour to complete.